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Omega-3 fatty acids may improve blood pressure in kidney disease patients

September 28, 2009

A combination of omega-3 fatty acids and coenzyme Q10 may decrease blood pressure and heart rate in kidney disease patients, reports a new study.

The results of the randomized controlled trial showed that people with chronic kidney disease (CKD) receiving omega-3 fatty acids (4 grams) for 8 weeks experienced a 3.3 and 2.9 mmHg decrease in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and a reduction of heart rate of 4.0 beats per minute (1). Furthermore, triglyceride levels decreased by 24 percent in this group.

In the group receiving omega-3 fatty acids plus coenzyme Q10 (200 mg), systolic and diastolic blood pressure improved by 2.7 and 3.4 mmHg, respectively. CoQ10 did not benefit blood pressure and was associated with a slight increase in heart rate.

The researchers commented that the finding of an interaction between omega-3 fatty acids and CoQ10 on blood pressure is difficult to explain in view of the lack of effect of CoQ10 alone on blood pressure and needs confirmation.

According to the publication, CKD increases the risk of heart disease two- to 50-fold and increases the prevalence of all-cause mortality and hospitalization. Modifiable risk factors include high blood pressure (hypertension). By lowering blood pressure, omega-3 fatty acids may reduce cardiovascular risk in non-diabetic patients with moderate-to-severe CKD.

References

  1. Mori T.A. et al. The effects of omega-3 fatty acids and coenzyme Q10 on blood pressure and heart rate in chronic kidney disease: a randomized controlled trial. Journal of Hypertension, 2009; 27(9):1863–1872.
  2. Mori T.A. et al. The effects of omega-3 fatty acids and coenzyme Q10 on blood pressure and heart rate in chronic kidney disease: a randomized controlled trial. Journal of Hypertension, 2009; 27(9):1863–1872.