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Increased intakes of vitamin K show no improvements in bone loss in women, suggests a new Norwegian study.

April 27, 2010

Increased intakes of vitamin K show no improvements in bone loss in women, suggests a new Norwegian study.

In the randomized controlled trial, 344 healthy postmenopausal women were randomly assigned to receive a daily placebo capsule (olive oil) or vitamin K2 (360 micrograms) for one year (1). At the end of the study no difference in bone loss was observed between the groups.

However, experts commented that the study did not fulfil criteria in order to fully examine if vitamin K2 could affect bone health, as it only lasted for 12 months, which is not enough. All vitamin K intervention trials lasting less thantwo years have unfortunately contributed to confusion regarding the effect of vitamin K supplements, the scientists said.

A number of previous studies appear to support the benefits of vitamin K for boosting bone health and reducing the risk of osteoporosis. A significant body of evidence also exists supporting a role for the vitamin in enhancing cardiovascular health. Emerging evidence also supports a potential role for reducing the risk of prostate cancer and boosting joint health.

References

  1. Emaus N. et al. Vitamin K2 supplementation does not influence bone loss in early menopausal women: a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trial. Osteoporosis International. 2010.